close this bookMicrolivestock - Little-Known Small Animals with a Promising Economic Future
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View the documentAcknowledgments
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
close this folderPart I : Microbreeds
View the document1 Microcattle
View the document2 Microgoats
View the document3 Microsheep
View the document4 Micropigs
close this folderPart II : Poultry
View the document5 Chicken
View the document6 Ducks
View the document7 Geese
View the document8 Guinea Fowl
View the document9 Muscovy
View the document10 Pigeon
View the document11 Quail
View the document12 Turkey
View the document13 Potential New Poultry
close this folderPart III : Rabbits
View the document14 Domestic Rabbit
close this folderPart IV : Rodents
View the document15 Agouti
View the document16 Capybara
View the document17 Coypu
View the document18 Giant Rat
View the document19 Grasscutter
View the document20 Guinea Pig
View the document21 Hutia
View the document22 Mara
View the document23 Paca
View the document24 Vizcacha
View the document25 Other Rodents
close this folderPart V : Deer and Antelope
View the document26 Mouse Deer
View the document27 Muntjac
View the document28 Musk Deer
View the document29 South America's Microdeer
View the document30 Water Deer
View the document31 Duikers
View the document32 Other Small Antelope
close this folderPart VI : Lizards
View the document33 Green Iguana
View the document34 Black Iguana
close this folderPart VII Others
View the document35 Bees
close this folderAppendixes
View the documentA Selected Readings
View the documentB Research Contacts
View the documentC BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF PANEL MEMBERS
View the documentBoard on Science and Technology for International Development (BOSTID)

Part I : Microbreeds


FIGURE

Cattle, goats, sheep, and pigs supply millions of people around the world with the bulk of their cash and animal products. Yet scores of breeds - especially in the tropics - are left out of livestock development projects merely because they are considered too small. These "microbreeds"' have sometimes been considered genetic dead ends because they appear undersized and puny. Many of these traditional animals - some in local use for thousands of years - are disappearing, and even the small ancestors of large modern breeds are becoming extinct.

These small breeds deserve to be studied and developed in their own right. Throughout Africa, Asia, and Latin America, these usually hardy animals are especially adapted to traditional husbandry practices and harsh local conditions. Some have remarkable qualities and are well adapted to resist hostile weather, ravaging pestilence, and poor diets. In remote places and in areas of extreme climate, they are often vitally important for basic subsistence.

Indeed, because of stress or disease, or insufficient forage, land, or money, microbreeds may be the only practical livestock in many settings. Their individual output may be low, but it can be efficient considering the lack of care and poor feeds they are given. Their availability and the growing number of small-sized farms in the developing world make them increasingly worthy of consideration.

The following chapters in this section describe microcattle, microgoats, microsheep, and micropigs.

 

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