Toomer's Corner
Date: ca. 1900 Size: 470x179 pixels
Toomer's Corner (at right of large tree) has long been a center of Auburn life.  "In the past this was where people congregated to talk, to hear the news of the town, to discuss politics and college happenings," said Ellen Beard and Alice Cary Pick Gibson of the Auburn Heritage Association.  It also is a place to celebrate.  "It's wonderful to see so many happy people," a Georgia visitor said when caught up in Toomer's Corner madness after Auburn's football team defeated Alabama in 1982. In 1952, Shel Toomer, after observing more than half a century of pep rallies, parades, initiations, victory celebrations, and political speeches at his corner, sold the business to Auburn native and fellow druggist McAdory Lipscomb, who bought the three-store Toomer Building in 1974.  When did students begin "rolling Toomer's Corner" with toilet paper?  "The 'toilet paper over the wires' tradition didn't really begin until about fifteen years ago," Lipscomb told reporter Jackie Walburn in 1978.  But the corner had been a convenient place for victory celebrations for decades before that.  "I'ts stayed popular for whoopin' and hollerin' because of tradition and the small town atmosphere of Auburn.  The students want to get together out in the open. . .and Toomer's Corner is the best place for that," Mrs. Walburn quoted Lipscomb as saying
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